Hiking The Trail To Hemlock Falls

South of the entrance of Moccasin Creek State Park the trailhead starts. The trail also leads to some wet foot crossings, so be ready with your shoes getting wet. The hike to the trail has to options where each brings you several spectacular scenic views where a waterfall, bluff, and cascades from Moccasin Creek will…

South of the entrance of Moccasin Creek State Park the trailhead starts. The trail also leads to some wet foot crossings, so be ready with your shoes getting wet. The hike to the trail has to options where each brings you several spectacular scenic views where a waterfall, bluff, and cascades from Moccasin Creek will amaze you. There are also campsites available near the trail although Hemlock Falls do not have its own campsite. Campsites with reservation are near Moccasin Creek State Park.

From the Moccasin Creek State Park, you can walk about 2 miles from here or go through a bumpy ride on this dirt road directly to the trailhead. The trailhead is a big stone marker on the ground carved with the name of Hemlock Falls Trail. From the trailhead, the pathway parallels the Moccasin Creek on an old rocky roadbed. The footpath staying always close to the river makes the hike simply revitalizing. As you continue further you will notice growths of eastern white pine, basswood, sweet birch, rosebay rhododendron, and eastern hemlock.

Continue walking this path about 0.4 miles until you will reach a small stream which is a tributary that plunges 8 feet onto the rock slab. Pace further as the path reaches a wooden bridge, then cross the creek where the trail continues to parallel the cascades. There is a 0.3 mile more toward the focal point of this trail as your move along this other side of the river. If you walk this trail around winter or after a recent rain, you will notice another waterfall which is just around 45 feet moving down a bluff across the creek.

Just a short distance from that section the Hemlock Falls drops into a pool and astounds you of its magnificence. The Hemlock falls is a 15 feet high drop that cascades into Moccasin Creek and bluffs. This marks the end of the trail although a patchwork trail used to be a footpath that connected the Moccasin Falls to Addis Gap and then finally to the Appalachian Trail.

The Moccasin Creek Falls drops at 30 feet high and 40 feet wide. However, this unblazed path has now been blocked due to a blizzards, hurricanes, and snowstorms. The path has been damaged by these weather changes where several deadfalls make it harder for trekkers to pass this. Neverheless, some portions of this pathway to Addis are still passable if you prefer to continue to a much longer trail.

Hiking The Panther Creek Trail

The Panther Creek Trail passes through hardwood forests of white pine and hemlock trees with rocky bluffs and steep uphill ascents. The footpath moves upstream toward the focal point of this trip up where the Panther Creek and Davidson Creek join at the waterfalls. The trail is marked with blue blazes. The pathway starts at…

The Panther Creek Trail passes through hardwood forests of white pine and hemlock trees with rocky bluffs and steep uphill ascents. The footpath moves upstream toward the focal point of this trip up where the Panther Creek and Davidson Creek join at the waterfalls. The trail is marked with blue blazes. The pathway starts at a wooded area on a four-lane overpass which is in the Tallulah Falls Railroad vicinity. The path then makes a long curve back to the woods as it parallels Panther creek. This northern section of Georgia is also filled with a few side paths to the creek. The area is also part of the Gainesville Ridges and that the US Highway 441 used to run between the parking area and the trailhead section of this trail in the 1990's.

From the Panther Creek overpass, the trail continues to make a drop at approximately 70 feet a steep downhill traverse. Move along a steep vertical drop to the cascade. At the site of a third rock formation, move further down the path as the trail curves left and ascending through a small access path within the rock and move forward approximately 30 feet to the mountain top. Follow the blue blazes as you move past a rock with carved with the word trail on it. Continue towards the rest of the path as you approach to climb the crevice where you will have to take balance on a steel cable attached to the structure.

The trail then gets closer and stay s within the ridge as it continues to parallel the stream. The path then joins Panther Creek again as it leads you to cross the wooden bridge to the other side of the creek. The pathway is level and mostly easy as you get closer to the sound of water dropping and cascading downstream.

At this area, you will notice some ferns and several tributaries that conjoin at the creek. Pace further to a steep climb a mile more on the path. From here, the Mill Shoals Falls is on the left and just a short distance further you will approach the Panther Creek Falls. The falls offer visitors and hikers a wonderful serene environment on this fairly challenging but fun trail. This section is also almost directly located on the Brevard Fault Line. On the southern end of the falls, the path follows the creek for a few feet until it winds down into some coves nearby.

The Hike To Hidden Pond Songbird Trail

Hidden Pond Songbird Tail is one of the short hikes that was established by the Corps of Engineers. It takes less than a mile to trek this short trail with little elevation. The site is located in the Reregulation Dam Recreation Area right on the west section of Carters Lake. Carters Lake is also a…

Hidden Pond Songbird Tail is one of the short hikes that was established by the Corps of Engineers. It takes less than a mile to trek this short trail with little elevation. The site is located in the Reregulation Dam Recreation Area right on the west section of Carters Lake. Carters Lake is also a known recreation spot for individuals who want to take a break from some frequented areas on this trail. Along the way you will pass Georgia Road's remnant that was built back in 1804 during the Treaty of Tlico. After Andre Jackson and his battle did some work on this road in 1819, this had then been called the old Federal Highway.

The Cherokee and farmers in the past have also used some trees along this trail as path marks. On the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee left this area and by 1977 a dam was created which then created a reregulation form near the Coosawattee River and Carters Lake. The trail moves along hugging the dam for at the reregulation pool.

From the south parking lot pace towards the marked trailhead found at the entrance of Carters Lake Dam. Just beyond this marker the trail splits into two paths. Take the right trail across the bridge as the treadway ascends to a moderately steep hill. From here the path returns to the original trail and then you will cross a longer bridge that takes you a closer view of the marsh. Along this path you will see several bird species including an osprey, wild turkey, and a hawk. Other wildlife such as raccoon, turtles, opossum, and white-tailed deer can be spotted here. Move past this and then turn right at the end of the bridge as the footpath swerves back to the original trail.

The end of the saddleback that formed Carters Lake can be seen at your left. Continue along this path reaching the beaver pond which was built by the Corps of Engineers with multiple viewing blinds for bird watching. This lake is home to many species of bird that inhabited the area for several centuries. There are great spots in this South Regulation Dam Park that is best for fishing and picnics. However, if you opt for a longer trek, there are other trails nearby such as the Big Acorn Nature Trail and the Rock Nature Trail which are both accessible at the Carters Lake Visitor Center.

Hiking The Newtown River Trail

The Newtown Trail parallels a river and sets forth onto an ascent on a knoll to the outlook. The Newtown Trail is at the New Echota State Park in Calhoun Georgia which runs along some areas which were used by the Cherokee before. From the start of the early nationalist movement, the Cherokee considered the…

The Newtown Trail parallels a river and sets forth onto an ascent on a knoll to the outlook. The Newtown Trail is at the New Echota State Park in Calhoun Georgia which runs along some areas which were used by the Cherokee before. From the start of the early nationalist movement, the Cherokee considered the New Echota as their capital before they were forced out to move to the west on the Trail of Tears. This disagreement over the land started in 1832 during Georgia's Sixth Land Lottery which had given this Cherokee land away to settlers. This site used to be a Cherokee hunting ground until wildlife also moved further to the west in the 19th century.

The whole trail will total to 2 miles including the trail to the New Echota. The New Echota State Park stands as testimony to the Cherokee Nation of Georgia which controlled the land from the Ohio River Valley to the Chattahoochee River Valley several centuries ago. The museum found it this state park will give you the historical background of the Cherokee removal from their capital city. The exhibits tell the stories about the Georgia gold rush and the development that occurred in New Echota.

The trail offers some historical sites where a restored office of the Cherokee Phoenix can be found. You can also find the Cherokee Supreme Court and the National Council House located here away from Samuel Worcestor's home and James Vann's tavern. The trailhead for this trail is visible on the left section of the road approximately halfway through the town. The trail dips to a river crescent where several wildlife species abound. Expect to have sightings of bird species such as golden eagles.

Moving away from the river, the Newtown Trail makes a gradual ascent into the forest where the path leads you to the top of a small knoll. At this spot you will find an overlook that offers you a view of the camping area used during town council meetings by the Cherokee. Many would camp here which can take up to 5,000 participants during these council meetings.

Continue to follow the path as it ends at the home of Samuel Worcestor who was a missionary. Worcestor was called by the Cherokee as “Messenger” although he was hated by the government of Georgia since they were concerned that he might halt the government settlements on this Cherokee land.

Hiking The Picketts Mill Trail

The trail's length is approximately 3.2 miles to complete wherein the Pickett's Mill State Park provides you three separate trails namely the White, Red, and Blue. The corresponding tracks feature certain aspect of the Civil War that occurred in May 27, 1863. The trail traverses a combination of gravel and historic roads. As you move…

The trail's length is approximately 3.2 miles to complete wherein the Pickett's Mill State Park provides you three separate trails namely the White, Red, and Blue. The corresponding tracks feature certain aspect of the Civil War that occurred in May 27, 1863. The trail traverses a combination of gravel and historic roads. As you move along the trail, a pine forest second growth which covers Kingston, Georgia's rolling hills south. The three trails can be conjoined by most hikers to provide them more time to hike the trail.

From the combined trails of the Red and Blue on a wooden overlook, pace straight forward to a wooden overlook as the path descends onto a road made of gravel instead of clay. The Red Trail then curves right as the Blue Trail continues to proceed ahead where there is an intersection. This sight is historical known to be the site of heavy fighting. Take the left path at this intersection and then make a quick right on the Red Trail.

Continue to follow the gravel road as the path now swerves left before approaching a cornfield at approximately 0.3 miles on the left. At this point, the trail reenters the woods where you will reach the north end of the cornfield and then you finally see the site of the Rebels hindering a second attack from the Hazens. The path then moves forward to a pine forest before the trail winds back to the Blue Trail as the path curves right. On the Blue Trail, take a left turn as the treadway now continues to make an extended climb to the visitors center.

Passing by a viewing deck where the visitors center is also on your left, the Blue Trail now turns into the White Trail which directs an easy swerve to the right. At this site, entrenchments on the left allow you to play with your imagination into connecting the historical background of what really happened here a long time ago. At 2.0 miles, the White Trail then comes to a Y. Take the left path as the White Trail then comes to a right turn and then proceeds to a numbered marker indicating the position of Union Troops after the Civil War.

Circle around the path as you move along the path where the trail blazes are. It will then lead to a junction between the Red and Blue Trail before approaching a gravel road. The path makes a steep descent and continues to Pickett's Mill Creek and head back uphill to where the Red and Blue Trails meet until finally intersecting with the White Trail. From here take a left turn and pace back to the outlook. From a numbered marker, set towards the continuation of the combined trails until the visitors center near the parking area.

Hiking The Laurel Ridge Trail

A fairly easy trail, the Laurel Ridge Trail follows the ridge line east of Lake Lanier and the Buford Dam. The trail head has numerous facilities and accommodations for your outdoor activities. It includes bathrooms, drinking fountain, swimming areas, boat ramps, and an easy family friendly hiking trail. Starting the trail at the Lower Overlook,…

A fairly easy trail, the Laurel Ridge Trail follows the ridge line east of Lake Lanier and the Buford Dam. The trail head has numerous facilities and accommodations for your outdoor activities. It includes bathrooms, drinking fountain, swimming areas, boat ramps, and an easy family friendly hiking trail. Starting the trail at the Lower Overlook, the path swerves left a short distance from a building across a small valley. Proceed to climb to a road that crosses a marked intersection. At this point, be cautious in crossing it due to the high speed cars passing.

Moving away from Buford Dam Road, a brown metal structure makes a path exclusive only for hikers. However, dogs are not allowed in this trail as a policy imposed by the Lake Lanier Authority. The path then makes an easy downhill trek and then curves right onto the first picnic area where restrooms are nearby. Lined with benches, the path then begins to move another downhill terrain approaching the Chattahoochee River Valley. Neverheless, be careful in your journey down this path as some tree roots and smaller rocks make this terrain a bit challenging.

Finally at your right, you will reach an observation platform and from here go back onto the path to set forth an extended descent to another 0.4 miles. At this point, another overlook offers you the best view of Bowman's Island Unit. The trail continues to follow the level river birch-lined bank of the Chattahoochee River. Move further until you cross a small flood plain and then make a difficult climb towards the tributary of the Chattahoochee River.

Crossing a wooden bridge then a boulder, the path leads you to an ascent passing a bench in a wooden bridge. Move past this and approach a set of stone pillows and then cross Buford Dam Road. It will then continue to a second set of stone bills prior to entering a mostly shaded forest. Set forth into an open field as the path curves left and moves down to a set of steps. From here you will cross a land bridge before swerving right.

Crossing the two park access roads, the Laurel Ridge Trail comes to a small playground with pavilion surrounded by picnic tables and a grill. The trail continues onto a sidewalk as it goes down to another set of steps and finally swerving left. Then the path makes a right turn and then another left back to a compainted clay ground where a white blaze directs you to the correct path for the trail back. The path then goes back on a boardwalk to the view of Lake Lanier. Just follow this path as it takes you back to the park's lakeshore.

Hiking The Helton Creek Falls

The start of the 10-minute quarter of a mile hike to Helton Creek Falls is at the small graveled parking area on Helton Creek Road. The waterfall is near the Blood Mountain, and this is an easy trail to the falls which makes it just very close to the parking lot. It is near the…

The start of the 10-minute quarter of a mile hike to Helton Creek Falls is at the small graveled parking area on Helton Creek Road. The waterfall is near the Blood Mountain, and this is an easy trail to the falls which makes it just very close to the parking lot. It is near the Vogel State Park where there is a camping area where there are cabins and tents for an overnight outdoor adventure. Helton Creek Falls' Cherokee name means land of a thousand waterfalls and for that fact, it has two falls. The road on Helton Creek is mostly made of gravel.

To get here, the falls is about a mile south of Vogel State Park just right on Helton Creek Road off US 19. From the parking lot, move towards the path on the right where the trailhead is found. An arrow with a simple mark leads you to a pathway that descends to the Helton Creek mountain cove where several species of fauna sprout. This area has been originally built and maintained by the Civilian Conservation Corps. Continue to make an ascent until reaching a boardwalk at the upper falls.

There is a set of stone staircase on left which gives access down to the lower part of the falls. This will then lead you to an observation or viewing deck where you can have the vantage point while watching the water plunge from the first falls. Known commonly as the Lower Helton Creek Falls, this section provides a panoramic panoramic view of the wide magnetic falls as it is complemented by its surrounding fauna.

About 30 feet high from the top, the first waterfall plunges from a rock ledge and cascades down to a small clear and pristine pool. Back at the viewing deck, continue to take the stairs and climb up the trail around the left side. Here you will emerge to another viewing area at the top of the Lower Falls. Move past this as the footpath leads you to the Upper Helton Creek Falls.

The second falls is a striking and taller one yet less wide than the first and its water plunges 50 feet down into a pool. The trail is a fairly short one yet its proximity to Vogel State Park will give you the option to explore the other trails nearby. The path to Helton Creek Falls is easy to navigate and is well marked but if not accessible by wheelchairs.

Hiking The Gold Branch Trail

The Gold Branch Trail starts at the parking area where a kiosk with a brown roof is located. The left side of this kiosk is a path which leads to a set of steps that leads to a shaded forest footpath. The path then takes you to a long boardwalk bridge across the Gold Branch…

The Gold Branch Trail starts at the parking area where a kiosk with a brown roof is located. The left side of this kiosk is a path which leads to a set of steps that leads to a shaded forest footpath. The path then takes you to a long boardwalk bridge across the Gold Branch creek. The stream looks more like the wetlands in section as the path ascends toward the left following the Gold Branch to Bull Sluice Lake. The footpath then swerves right where it emerges to the Bull Sluice Lake.

The lake is noticeably deeper and calmer than the Chattahoochee River. Move further the next half mile of the Gold Branch Trail where you will meet several side trails that leads you to fishing areas on the left. This is a great fishing area where the catch may include bass, bread, brown and rainbow trout, crappie, and perch. Continue past this area and slowly move downhill about 0.7 miles to a flat area about the level of the lake that leads you to a popular fishing spot.

Straight ahead you will pass through the most scenic views of the lake as the trail reaches a rock outcrop about slightly less than a quarter mile after. Make a turn back to a wide intersection taking the right path. Then start to move toward the Chattahoochee watershed by making a gradual difficult climb to it. The climb then begins to abate at the top of the first knoll but briefly it switches back to a difficult ascent to the second knoll. The footpath takes you to a dirt road where you will take a left turn as you begin a descent to Bull Sluice Lake's shore.

Before reaching the water, the footpath swerves right into the forest for about 1.5 mile with a difficult terrain. Pass some wet foot crossings, the path swerves left as it ascends back to the lake shore. A series of quick switchbacks is to be expected while getting around a rock outcrop. Rejoining Gold Branch, cross some streams and then find your way back to the lake shore. Continue forward to a gravel road leaving the Bull Sluice Lake shore but expect a moderate to difficult terrain here.

Reaching a map stand at the peak of the hill, the trail makes a right turn following the original roadbed of Lower Roswell Road. Take the second roadbed to your right as it reaches a T where you will turn left and pace forward back to the boardwalk bridge ending at the start of the trail.

The Hike To Glen Falls Trail

The trail to Glen Falls is an easy hike where it leads to a high mountain waterfall below the ridge of the east portion of the Lookout Mountain. This is maintained and managed by the National Park Service. The trail is located in Walker County Georgia just outside Chattanooga Tennessee. You may start at a…

The trail to Glen Falls is an easy hike where it leads to a high mountain waterfall below the ridge of the east portion of the Lookout Mountain. This is maintained and managed by the National Park Service. The trail is located in Walker County Georgia just outside Chattanooga Tennessee. You may start at a small parking area at the entrance of the trail. Most part of the trail is downhill trek which historically starts a climb as it reaches near the waterfalls.

To get here starting from Dalton, take the I-75 north of Chattanooga and then turn west by taking I-24. Move forward to the exit 178 South and straight to the traffic light at Broad Street from which you take a left turn. Continue straight forward and upon reaching two roads, take the Tennessee Ave at the left where it will take you to the Ochs Highway.

From the Ochs Highway, the trailhead begins to a slight descent to a wide pathway. Moving along this path takes you 200 feet down the mountain where the trail emerges out into a spectacular view of the waterfall. The path circles the ridge of the mountain that gives you the option to explore a section of the Lookout Mountain. As you wind up with a series of short switchbacks, pace further into an eroded section of the path at the brow of Lookout Mountain.

The passage then begins to bring you closer to the falls. The mist coming from the water that plunges into the deep pool fills the air with a refreshing slight sprinkle along with the overpowering sound coming deep from the crevice of the mountain. The lower two falls are seen as you move towards a bridge. The bridge covered with fieldstone leads you to a small pond at the base of the falls. Past the bridge, climb some rock steps where it leads to a small tunnel in the rock and pace further.

Then the path begins to move toward the top section of the waterfalls where a passage through the rocks emerges out into a view that is about 30 feet above Glen Falls. At this point you will have an up close view of the waterfalls in this narrow passage. Glen Falls is made up of a series of small falls way deep into the boulders and rocks of the Lookout Mountain. This part marks the focal point of your journey where the magnificent scenic view makes the trip a short and worthwhile experience.

The Hike To Falls Branch Falls

The hike to Falls Branch Fall is a beautiful and easy trail which starts from the Stanley Creek Road. This is also a good trail to start and combined with the trek up to Rocky Mountain Trail. The trail also offers fishing areas as you move upstream to a double set of waterfalls where it…

The hike to Falls Branch Fall is a beautiful and easy trail which starts from the Stanley Creek Road. This is also a good trail to start and combined with the trek up to Rocky Mountain Trail. The trail also offers fishing areas as you move upstream to a double set of waterfalls where it will take you just a quarter mile to reach it. This trail is closest to the town of Blue Ridge, Georgia. To get here from Blue Ridge, proceed to old US 76 then to Aska Road. Take the south direction and move further approximate 8.2 miles to where you will meet the intersection at Stanley Creek Road.

Coming off 3.2 miles from the Stanley Creek Road, there is campsite near a small parking area just right after passing a wooden bridge over Falls Branch. The parking area is just a short distance after a farm owned by Forest Service fire warden Garfield Stanley. There is an old road at the left side of the parking lot which used to be a major road. Yet a short distance from the parking lot the trail splits into Jeffery Hell Trail at your right and Falls Branch Trail at your left.

The trail starts following the white diamond blazes of Benton MacKaye Trail where if you move further after reaching the falls, the trail proceeds to the southwest section to a climb up to Rocky Mountain. Along the trail you will see mountain laurel and rhododendron thriving on the creek's bank. Taking the footpath to right after a little more than a quarter mile, you will reach Falls Branch. Coming from the first switchback on Benton MacKaye Trail, the path passes a sided trail and approaches to a narrow path.

The trail continues to an observation deck that offers a magnificent view of the water dropping from the top of this 75-foot waterfall. The upper section of Fall Branch Falls is where several cascades are seen; which then combine into one major stream before plunging into the base of the falls. Several species of wildlife live in this habitat where you may even see a wild turkey along the way. Just 30 yards above the waterfall, there is a small camping spot and picnic area where you can take a breath and bask at the spectacular eco-system around you.

If the trail is just too short and easy for you, some hikers move further the waterfalls and continue taking the Benton MacKaye trail for another two-mile ascent to Rocky Mountain. Neverheless, the climb to it is gradual and can be rated from easy to moderate.