Hitting the Hiking Trail

Experienced hikers are well aware that the sport helps them reduce the stress of every-day life and spend some time bonding with nature as well. Some of them join a hiking club, while others hit the trail with a partner or hike by themselves. Ironically, hiking is a way in which they challenge themselves physically,…

Experienced hikers are well aware that the sport helps them reduce the stress of every-day life and spend some time bonding with nature as well. Some of them join a hiking club, while others hit the trail with a partner or hike by themselves. Ironically, hiking is a way in which they challenge themselves physically, even as they find relaxation in leaving other challenges behind.

How hikers should train

Would-be trail blazers may be physically fit, but they will have to go through a training period before going out on the trail. They can begin by hiking along local roads or a park their home for 1 to 3 miles, wearing hiking boots or comfortable shoes, and making sure that they return before dark. They should also add to the length of their walkers gradually, until they can comfortably hike as much as 9 miles. In addition, a hand-held GPS is a good investment for hikers to avoid becoming lost, and if they forgo that option, they should start out with a topographical map of the terrain and a compass to guide them.

What hikers should eat

The food they carry in their backpack should be filling and also provide enough protein to supply the energy they need. When they are on the trail, hikers use many more calories than they usually do, and nutritional meals are essential on an all-day hike. Note that the energy hikers need is not in proportion with the speed they maintain, but the energy required to increase their speed is doubled by every additional mile per hour they add to it. This means that if they hike at a lower rate, they will be able to cover a longer distance with the same amount of energy.

What hikers may need

Blisters can be a serious problem on the trail, but there are ways to avoid them. Since blisters are caused by heat, moisture, and rubbing against the skin, they wear hiking shoes or boots that fit well and bring a change of socks for extended hikes, or if their feet get wet while hiking. They can also use a pair of running shoes that feel comfortable on a flat surface or for a short hike. Those who know the sport suggest taking a basic first-aid kit that has disinfectant, gauze, sterile bandages, and surgical tape, to treat injuries that sometimes occur on the trail.